Where to Go Camping Guide

The primary goal of the Order of the Arrow (OA) is to promote good Scout camping. A requirement for acceptance into OA is the demonstration to fellow Scouts the skills and attitudes of successful camping. Thus, it only follows that this organization should help promote those same skills and attitudes.

With this in mind, Jaccos Towne Lodge has published this Where to Go Camping guide. This guide is designed to help units plan and carry out a camping program best designed for the specific needs of their unit and Scouts. This guide will not only contain camping information but places to go hiking, canoeing, and climbing.

This guide is an ongoing process and is always growing. If your unit knows of a good place to go camping that is not listed, please feel free to let the Camp Promotions Committee know and they will add the sites that you suggest. We hope that we can continue to build on this guide to make it the best that it can be.

Council Scout Camps

Crossroads of America Council boasts five camp properties. Several of these properties and facilities are available to rent by all groups, organizations and individuals.

From primitive campsites to modern cabins to meeting rooms, these properties have all types of facilities to meet any group’s needs. While you may think of Scout camps as a location for a weekend campout, these properties also routinely host community service group meetings, business conferences, parties and weddings.

Camp Belzer

Located on the northeast side of Indianapolis, Belzer is easily accessible from I-465. During the summer, this camp serves as the day camp for our youngest Cub Scouts with three swimming pools and multiple program shelters. There are three year-round cabins, which can accommodate up to 24 people each. Camping is available for any sized group. Located near the parking area is the 10,000 square foot Activity Center. This building can accommodate groups up to 300 in two large conference rooms with a full commercial kitchen and multiple breakout rooms. All meeting rooms have integrated AV equipment available. Camp Belzer features plenty of parking and is fully wheelchair accessible.

Camp Kikthawenund

Fun and excitement rule at Camp Kikthawenund. During the summer, the camp hosts Adventure Camp, our three-day, two-night overnight camp for Cub Scouts. During the rest of the year, the 230-acre camp, located 20 minutes north of Noblesville, is available for many other uses. The beautiful Dining Hall is available year-round and can easily accommodate 400 for meals. There are three year-round cabins that each sleep 24. Ten primitive campsites and heated central restrooms and showers are available for use. Fun program sites such as the pool, Fort Miami, Dan Beard Tree House, Western Town shelters, Indian Village and the Lake Cherokee Riverboat Shelter can each be rented for use, as well.

Camp Krietenstein

An easy one-hour drive west of downtown Indianapolis, Camp Krietenstein has a rich history and excellent camping opportunities. During the summer, Camp Krietenstein serves exclusively as our Webelos Resident Camp. During the rest of the year, there are many facilities available for your group to rent. A five-acre lake, program shelters and a new dining hall are conveniently located in the center of camp. The year-round dining hall can seat up to 250 people. There are seven primitive campsites located near the main camp area. A fishing pier, hiking trails and campfire area allow you to enjoy all the natural beauty of Camp Krietenstein.

Camp Red Wing

Located on the southeast side of Muncie on the White River, Camp Red Wing has been serving Scouts since 1925. Many weeks of the summer are busy at Camp Red Wing as it hosts NYLT Youth Leadership Program and a District Day Camp. The Kiwanis Lodge is the showpiece facility for the camp. It is a multipurpose building that seats 150 people and is available for year-round use. One year-round cabin is available which sleeps up to 24. All campsites, facilities and shelters are conveniently located near to each other.

Ransburg Scout Reservation

With 624 acres located on Lake Monroe and surrounded by the Hoosier National Forest, Ransburg Scout Reservation is one of the Midwest’s premier camps. A 15-minute drive from Bloomington, the camp offers a wide range of opportunities in one of the most beautiful areas of Indiana. In the summer, Ransburg hosts Scouts BSA summer camp programs. During the rest of the year, there are many facilities available for your group to rent. Two lake-front cabins house a total of 40 per building in three separate apartments. The Inlow Aquatics Center is a lake-front lodge which can sleep up to 20 with a full kitchen. Its grand stone fireplace, soaring windows, loft area and break-out meeting rooms make it perfect for a group retreat. The dining hall seats 420 and is available from September to May. With miles of trails, mountain bikes and canoes, a ropes course, climbing tower and shooting range there is no shortage of activities for your group at Ransburg Scout Reservation.

Indiana Camping

Brown County State Park

Located in the beautiful hills of Brown County off Highway 46, you will especially enjoy the variety offered in Indiana’s largest state park, including nearly 20 miles of roads, with numerous scenic vistas.

Comfortable accommodations at the rustic Abe Martin Lodge, large campgrounds, hiking trails, interpretive services, and extensive horse riding facilities are some of the things that make Brown County State Park popular year-round.

Nearby Nashville, Indiana, features quaint specialty shops, art galleries, entertainment, and historic homes. A visit to T.C. Steele State Historic Site or Yellowwood State Forest make your visit complete.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • RVs Use West Gate
  • Electric / 401 sites
  • Non-Electric / 28 sites
  • Rally / 60 sites
  • Horsemen’s – Entrance off 135 South
    • Electric / 118 sites
    • Non-Electric / 86 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Chain O’Lakes

This is lake country and a small boater’s paradise. Eight connecting lakes will be the center of your adventures at Chain O’Lakes State Park in Noble County.

Paddle through the chain, hike the trails, or attend a nature program in the park’s ‘old schoolhouse’ nature center.

At nearby Rome City, you can visit the Gene Stratton-Porter Home, State Historic Site.

Activities & Facilities

  • Boat Launch Ramp
  • Boating / Elect. motor only
  • Nature Center / Interpretive Naturalist Services (Seasonal)
  • Shelters (Shelter Reservations)
  • Rental-Canoe, Paddleboat, Rowboat Canoe rental on weekends & holiday by the hour only
  • Cross Country Skiing / No Ski Rental
  • Fishing / Ice Fishing
  • Hiking Trails
  • Swimming / Beach

Camping

  • Electric / 331 sites
  • Non-Electric / 49 sites
  • Primitive / 33 sites
  • Rally Camp / 4 sites
  • Canoe Camp
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Campground Reservations
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Charlestown

Charlestown State Park is located in southern Indiana with easy access from I-65, 8 miles to the east on state road 62. With scenic vistas of the Fourteenmile Creek valley and elevation changes of over 200 feet, Charlestown has much to offer the visitor with this diversity. While hiking the rugged terrain you will see Devonian fossil outcrops and areas of karst sinkhole topography. Bird watchers will enjoy the 72 species of birds, including bluebirds, black vultures and an occasional Bald Eagle.

Charlestown is one of two state parks offering full hookup campsites.

Activities & Facilities

  • Hiking Trails
  • Picnic areas w/ shelters (Shelter Reservations)
  • Fishing, along 14 Mile Creek bank on Trail 3
  • Playground Equipment
  • Camping
  • Interpretive Naturalist Services (seasonal)

Camping

  • Full Hookup / 60 sites
  • Electric / 132 sites
  • Campground Reservations

Clifty Falls

Clifty Falls State Park is located near Madison with entrances off state roads 56 and 62. The name Clifty Falls paints a beautiful picture in your mind. Winter and spring hiking shows the falls at their best while the rugged splendor of the creek and canyon offer exciting scenery year-round.

In historic Madison tour the Lanier State Historic Site, mansion of frontier banker James F.D. Lanier and enjoy the drive along the beautiful Ohio River. Plan a park visit during one of the community’s special events such as the Madison Chautauqua Art Festival or Regatta hydroplane boat race.

Note: Due to a quirk with how our 1501 Green Road address is interpreted by major on-line mapping services, customers using this as a destination address are often led to a dead end street. To successfully build a map that will get you to our gate off of state road 62 please use “2221 Clifty Drive” as your destination address.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 106 sites
  • Primitive / 59 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station

Falls of the Ohio

Located on the banks of the Ohio River at 201 West Riverside Drive, Clarksville, Indiana (I-65 exit 0), is the Falls of the Ohio State Park. The 386-million-year-old fossil beds are among the largest exposed Devonian fossil beds in the world. The park features a spectacular interpretive center overlooking the fossil beds. Inside you will find a 14 minute movie, an exhibit gallery with river and marine aquariums.

Fishing, hiking, fossil viewing, bird watching, and picnicking are among the most common activities.

While fossil collecting is prohibited, the park staff encourages visitors to explore and discover the many different types of fossils that can be found on the ancient sea bottom. The months of August thru October provide the best accessibility to the 220 acres of fossil beds, as the river is at its lowest level during this period. Please call for times, prices and group information.

Activities & Facilities

  • Hiking Trails
  • Picnic areas
  • Fishing
  • Education Programs
  • Boat Launch Ramp (Ohio River)
  • Interpretive Naturalist Services
    • Special programs & events
    • George Rogers Clark cabin

Fort Harrison

Do not use computer mapping directions or mailing address, they are incorrect. Due to a quirk it will land you in the wrong place. Please call park direct for directions. Springtime is a great season at the park. Park patrons may also enjoy the park all year around including the winter season at Fort Harrison State Park the sledding hill is one of the biggest in this area, enjoy cross-county skiing on one of park’s scenic, nature trails, To break the “ice” of sitting around home in the winter, ice fishing on the park’s lake is also a great winter activity.

Landscape and history blend in a unique setting in northeast Indianapolis at Fort Harrison State Park. The 1700-acre park features walking and jogging trails, picnic sites, fishing access to Fall Creek and two national historic districts. The former Citizen’s Military Training Camp, Civilian Conservation Corps camp, and World War II prisoner of war camp is preserved at the park headquarters location.

Visitors may enjoy a stop at the park’s interpretive center to view exhibits and ask questions of park naturalists. Springtime is a great season to enjoy woodland wildflowers, to watch for warblers flying north for breeding season or listen for elusive resident pileated woodpeckers.

Activities & Facilities

The Fort Golf Resort & Conference Center

  • Harrison House Suites & 3 Historic Officer’s Homes
  • The Garrison w/ Dining & Conference Facilities
  • 5 Meeting Rooms
  • Golf Course / 18 holes & Driving Range
  • Mother’s Mercantile Nature Shop/Store

Harmonie

Harmonie State Park is located “on the banks of the Wabash,” 25 miles northwest of Evansville. A beautiful swimming pool, shady picnic areas, ravines and pristine landscape await you here. This is a trail lover’s paradise! Trails for walking, biking and nature hikes will lure you for a visit.

Nearby Historic New Harmony honors two unique communities from the early 1800s. The Rappites located here in 1814. They were fleeing from religious persecution and awaiting the impending millennium. In 1824, the Owenites brought many great scientists and philosophers into the area when they purchased the Rappites holdings.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 200 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Camp Store
  • Campground Reservations
  • Dumping Station

Indiana Dunes

We are now taking reservations for the 140 campsites (all with 50 amp electrical service) in its completely reconstructed campground. Two new modern restroom/shower houses are heated to lengthen the comfortable camping season. A new shelter for programs has been added to the area.

Online reservations are available at camp.IN.gov or toll free at 1-866-6CAMPIN (866-622-6746).

Let’s head for the beach! You’ll love the sights and sounds of the three miles of shoreline along Lake Michigan.

A beautiful nature center offers details of the history of the dunes area and a variety of special programming year-round.

The sand dunes will astound you, as will the vast variety of desert plants, giant wood ferns and white pines.

Activities & Facilities

  • Nature Center/Interpretive Naturalist Services (9:00 AM to 5:00 PM)
  • Picnicking/Shelters (Shelter Reservations)
  • Access to Calumet Trail (9 miles of hiking)
  • Cross-country Skiing (trails available, no ski rental)
  • Fishing (Smelt Only)
  • Hiking Trails
  • Swimming / Beach (See Swim Alert)
  • Birding

Camping

  • Electric – 140 (all 50 amp service)
  • Youth Tent Area

Lincoln

Visit Lincoln State Park and discover Indiana’s past throughout ten miles of hiking trails, rolling forested hills and two scenic lakes. Sleep among the trees in our lakeside campground, log cabins or group cottages. Visit the Colonel Jones Home, the historic home of the merchant employer of young Abraham Lincoln.

The 1,747 acre park was established in 1932 as a memorial to Nancy Hanks. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was instrumental in establishing the recreational facilities now found in the park. The CCC was a national program designed to provide jobs for unemployed young men during the Great Depression. At Lincoln State Park, CCC crews built beautiful Lake Lincoln, Lakeside shelter, the boat rental building (formerly a ranger cabin) and many trails.

Sarah Lincoln Woods Nature Preserve is located in the southernmost portion of the park. A visit to Lincoln State Park is like taking a step back into time when the land was wild and Abe Lincoln was a boy.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

McCormick’s Creek

Unique limestone formations and scenic waterfalls are some of the beautiful highlights at Indiana’s first state park, McCormick’s Creek. You’ll find this park along the White River, 14 miles northwest of Bloomington.

Hike through the thick wooded area or roam leisurely through the magnificent canyon surrounded by high cliffs. You’ll notice the well-manicured grounds which were planted by the original owner and are being preserved to sustain the tranquil environment he created.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 189 sites
  • Primitive / 32 sites
  • Group Camping
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station
  • Camp Store

Mounds

Mounds State Park, located off I-69 east of Anderson, features 10 unique “earthworks” built by a group of prehistoric Indians known as the Adena-Hopewell people. The largest earthwork, the “Great Mound”, is believed to have been constructed around 160 B.C. Archaeological surveys seem to indicate it was used as a gathering place for religious ceremonies.

Be sure to include time to visit the new Nature Center. The new building includes a bird viewing room, small animal displays and much more.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 75 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station

O’Bannon Woods

More information is available at the old Wyandotte Woods SRA page.

The O’Bannon Woods State Park (formally Wyandotte Woods State Recreation Area) lies in the central and extreme southern part of the state, bordering the Ohio River. The forest contains about 26,000 acres including the Wyandotte Caves State Recreation Area.

Located near the park is the Corydon Capitol State Historic Site. Built entirely of limestone, visitors will learn about early Indiana history as they tour the beautiful building.

The area offers electrical campsites, as well as the Stagestop Campground, which offers primitive and youth camping. A canoe access ramp is also available at the Stagestop Campground.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric – 281 sites
  • Horseman Non-Electric – 47 sites
  • Primitive Non-Electric – 25 sites
  • Group Camp (100-bed self-contained structures)
  • Dumping Station

Ouabache

Ouabache is difficult to spell, but easy to pronounce. Simply say ‘Wabash’…just like the river that forms the southwest boundary for the park. This is the French spelling of an Indian word, so don’t be surprised to hear some folks call it o-ba-chee.

Kunkel Lake offers excellent fishing. During the summer months, a naturalist will provide information about the natural wonders of the park. A lodge recreation building is ideal for special gatherings and is now available all year.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric – 77 sites
  • Non-Electric – 47 sites
  • Dumping Station

Pokagon

Pokagon State Park is located near Angola off I-69. Natural lakes abound in this area and the park borders on Lake James and Snow Lake which offer abundant opportunities for boating, swimming and fishing.

What a thrill! That’s what you’ll say once you’ve experienced the quarter mile toboggan track at speeds of 35-40 miles per hour! The toboggan operates weekends from the Friday after Thanksgiving through February, with extended holiday hours. The toboggan is open on Christmas Eve, but closed on Christmas Day.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 200 sites
  • Non-Electric / 73 sites
  • Camp, Group
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station
  • Camp Store

Potato Creek

Potato Creek is located in north central Indiana about 12 miles southwest of South Bend. The park features a wide array of activities and facilities for year-round enjoyment. We would suggest making reservations at this very popular park.

A variety of natural habitats await the visitor to this park including the 327 acre Worster Lake, old fields, mature woodlands, restored prairies and diverse wetlands. Each of these offers their own unique opportunities for plant and wildlife observations.

Activities & Facilities

  • Nature Center/Interpretive Services
  • Picnicking/Shelters (Shelter Reservations)
  • Bicycle Trail / 3.2 miles
  • Boat Launch Ramps / 2
  • Boat Motor / Electric trolling only
  • Bridle Trails
  • Cabins / 17
  • Cross-country Skiing / No Ski Rental
  • Fishing / Ice Fishing / Fishing Pier
  • Fish Cleaning Station
  • Hiking Trails
  • Mountain Bike Trail / 6.6 miles
  • Playground Equipment
  • Rentals
    • Bicycle
    • Canoe, Paddleboat, Rowboat, Kayak, Trolling Motors
    • Recreation Building
  • Swimming / Beach (See Swim Alert)
  • Tubing Hill
  • Wildlife Observation Area

Camping

  • Electric / 287 sites
  • Horsemen’s Electric / 70 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Prophetstown

Located where the Tippecanoe River meets the Wabash near Battle Ground, Indiana, the park’s landscape has been shaped by ice from the glaciers, moving water, fire that helped maintain the vast tallgrass prairie and human hands. Native Americans hunted and lived along the two rivers for thousands of years. French trappers and traders found the land teeming with wildlife, and European farmers discovered that the rich, deep prairie soils grew healthy corn and wheat.

The park is named for a Native American village located between the rivers established by Tecumseh, who was Shawnee, and his brother Tenskwatawa (The Prophet) in 1808. Tecumseh led his band there from Ohio, where pressure from white settlers had forced him to leave. Tecumseh believed the only way to repel the advance of European settlement was to form an alliance with other tribes. He traveled widely persuading tribes to join his coalition. Over 14 tribes set aside centuries old disputes to stop their common enemy. They met at Prophetstown, and heard The Prophet speak. Tecumseh anticipated their sheer numbers would be enough to stop the westward settlement.

William Henry Harrison, the governor of the Indiana Territory, was alarmed by the numbers at Prophetstown and moved 1200 troops to the site while Tecumseh was south gathering additional support. Wanting to avoid a fight, yet fearing an attack, The Prophet decided to strike first in the early morning hours of November 7, 1811. The battle lasted two hours. As darkness faded, the villagers withdrew through the marsh back to Prophetstown and then fled to Wildcat Creek. Harrison’s men burned Prophetstown to the ground.

Through our unique partnership with Historic Prophetstown, visitors can explore a re-creation of Prophetstown, a Native American settlement, and also discover 1920s farm lifestyles. We are restoring prairie and maintaining other habitats at Prophetstown, such as wetlands, wet slopes called fens, and open woodlands. We are creating places for you to enjoy the outdoors, with camping, hiking, birding and biking sure to top the list in the months to come.

Entrance fees now include admittance into Prophetstown State Park and Historic Prophetstown. ($5 gate fee Monday through Thursday and $6 gate fee Friday through Sunday and holidays for in-state vehicles. $8 daily gate fee for out-of-state vehicles.)

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Full Hook-up: 55 sites
  • Electric: 55 sites
  • Dumping Station

Nearby Places

Driving Directions

Take I-65 to exit number 178 which is SR 43 Go SOUTH on SR 43 (away from the park—trust me this is correct) for a very short distance and then turn LEFT onto Burnett Rd. Burnett Road will “T” into 9th St. Go right on 9th St. to Swisher Road which will be a HARD left immediately after the Veterinary Office. Once on Swisher Road you will cross back under the Interstate and find the Park Gatehouse directly ahead.

Do not use computer mapping directions, they are incorrect. Due to a quirk, it will land you in the WRONG PLACE.

Shades

Shades State Park is that peaceful place you’ve been looking for. Located about 17 miles southwest of Crawfordsville (off S.R. 47), it is a favorite for hikers and canoeists.

The beautiful sandstone cliffs overlooking Sugar Creek and numerous shady ravines provide the backdrop for your journey through this nature lover’s paradise.

Adjacent Pine Hills Nature Preserve affords spectacular topography for those willing to take a fairly long hike.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Non-Electric / 105 sites
  • Backpack / 7 sites
  • Canoe Camp / 10 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station

Shakamak

Ready to relax? Let’s head for Shakamak. Three man-made lakes offer 400 acres of water for fishing and boating while a new family aquatic center provides swimming fun.

About two-thirds of the campsites are in a wooded area, offering cool shade in the summer and beautiful fall colors in autumn.

Nearby is a playfield area for family fun. A popular feature of the park is the group camp.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Rent-A-Camp
    • 7 Rent-A-Camps that sleep 6
    • Electricity in buildings
    • Picnic table, fire ring, parking spur
    • Drinking water supply in area
    • Modern restrooms / showers
  • Regular Camping
    • Electric / 122 sites
    • Non-electric/ 42 sites
    • Maple Loop/ 10 sites with two paved, accessible sites
    • Group Camp
    • Youth Tent Area
    • Dumping Station
    • Camp Store

Spring Mill

Spring Mill abounds in endless opportunities for recreation! The restored pioneer village is a delight as you travel through time to the early 1800s.

Twin Caves is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Cost is $3.00 for adults and $1.00 children under eleven years of age. Tours run on the half-hour; no advance registrations are accepted (sign up on day of tour only). No children under three years of age are allowed on the tour.

The Grissom Memorial honors Hoosier astronaut Virgil “Gus” Grissom, one of the seven Mercury astronauts and America’s second man in space.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 187 sites
  • Primitive / 36 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Summit Lake

An expansive view and good fishing will beckon you to Summit Lake State Park, near New Castle. More than 2,680 acres including a large lake await your visit.

Facilities include 125 electric campsites, 3 boat ramps, a beach bathhouse and 2 large open shelters which can be reserved for family picnics and other events.

Summit Lake has an excellent bird watching and wildlife observation area.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 125 sites
  • Youth Tent Camping Area
  • Dumping Station

Tippecanoe River

Attention canoers! Get ready for a relaxing journey as you float down the beautiful Tippecanoe River. You must bring your own canoe or make arrangements with the local canoe livery. When you return, you can enjoy the beautiful campground facilities with your group, family or friends.

Warning: mosquitos can be very annoying at times during the season. Repellent is advised!

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 112 sites
  • Horsemen’s / 56 sites – primitive
  • Canoe Camp / 10 sites
  • Rent-A-Camp Cabins
  • Group Camp
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station

Turkey Run

You’ll marvel at the natural geologic wonders of this beautiful park as you hike along its famous trails. Nestled along State Road 47 southwest of Crawfordsville, you’ll want to explore the deep, sandstone ravines and walk along the stands of aged forests, and enjoy the scenic views along Sugar Creek.

Visit the Colonel Richard Lieber Cabin which commemorates the contributions of the father of Indiana’s state park system.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 213 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Versailles

Take a drive through the beautiful rolling hills of southeastern Indiana with Versailles State Park as your destination.

Relax while fishing on the 230-acre lake where you can rent a paddleboat, rowboat or canoe. In the fall enjoy activities like the Versailles Pumpkin Show in the town of Versailles on the last weekend in September.

Activities & Facilities

  • Picnic areas w/shelters (Shelter Reservations)
  • Interpretive Naturalist Services (Seasonal)
  • Boat Launch Ramp
  • Boat Motor / Electric trolling only
  • Bridle Trails (day use only)
  • Fishing
  • Hiking Trails
  • Mountain Bike Trails
  • Rental – Canoe, Paddleboat, Rowboat, and Kayak
  • Rental – Recreation Building
  • Swimming / Pool / Waterslide (Policy)

Camping

  • Electric / 226 sites
  • Group Camp
  • Youth Tent Camping Area
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Whitewater Memorial

Two-hundred acre Whitewater Lake and access to Brookville Reservoir, along with other recreational/facilities make Whitewater Memorial State Park a great family getaway. The land for the park was originally purchased by the surrounding counties of Union, Fayette, and Wayne as a memorial to the men and women who served in World War II.

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric – 236 sites
  • Non-electric – 45 sites
  • Horsemen’s primitive – 37 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station
  • Camp Store

Indiana Reservoirs

Brookeville Lake

Mounds SRA and Quakertown SRA
16,445 acres – 5,260-acre lake

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Full Hookup / 62 sites
  • Electric / 388 sites
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Cagles Mill Lake (Lieber SRA)

Cunot Ramp and Cataract Falls, Lieber SRA
8,075 acres – 1,400-acre lake

Activities & Facilities

  • Activity Center
  • Basketball Court
  • Boating / 2 Launch Ramps
  • Fishing
  • Fishing Pier
  • Handicapped Fishing Trips
  • Hiking / Fitness Trails
  • Horseshoe Pits
  • Hunting
  • Interpretive Naturalist Services
  • Picnicking / Shelterhouse
  • Playground Equipment
  • Rental – Fishing Boats, Pontoons
  • Waterskiing
  • Water Safari Boat Tours
  • Swimming / Pool / Waterslide (See Swim Alert)

Camping

  • Electric / 120 sites – Poplar Grove
  • Non-electric / 96 sites – Sunny Acres
  • Dumping Station

Cecil M. Harden Lake (Raccoon SRA)

Includes the Raccoon State Recreation Area and Historic Mansfield Roller Mill.
4,065 acres – 2,060-acre lake

Activities & Facilities

  • 1880’s Roller Mill (tours and corn grinding demonstrations)
  • Archery Range
  • Basketball Courts
  • Boating / 5 Launch Ramps
  • Fishing / Ice Fishing
  • Fishing Pier (open when water level permits)
  • Hiking Trails
  • Horseshoe Pits
  • Hunting (limited)
  • Interpretive Services
  • Picnicking / Shelterhouse
  • Playground Equipment
  • Rental – Fishing Boats, Pontoons
  • Swimming / Beach (See Swim Alert)
  • Volleyball Courts
  • Waterskiing
  • Wildlife Viewing Areas

Camping

  • Electric / 240 sites
  • Non-electric / 37 sites
  • Primitive / 35 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Camp Store
  • Dumping Station

Hardy Lake

2,178.16 acres – 741-acre lake

Activities & Facilities

  • Archery Range
  • Basketball Courts
  • Open Playfield
  • Volleyball Courts
  • Boating / 4 Launch Ramps
  • Fishing / Ice Fishing
  • Fishing Pier
  • Hiking Trails
  • Hunting
  • Interpretive Services
  • Picnicking / Shelterhouse
  • Playgrounds
  • Rental – Rowboat
  • Swimming / Beach (See Swim Alert)
  • Waterskiing

Camping

  • Electric / 149 sites – Shale Bluff
  • Primitive / 18 sites – Wooster
  • Dumping Station

J. Edward Roush Lake (Huntington Lake)

Little Turtle SRA and Kil-So-Quah SRA
8,217 acres – 870-acre lake

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Primitive / 130 sites
  • Youth Tent Areas

Mississinewa Lake

Miami SRA, Red Bridge SRA w/marina, Frances Slocum SRA, Pearson Mill SRA
14,386 acres – 3,210-acre lake

Activities & Facilities

  • Basketball Court, Horseshoes & Volleyball at Campground
  • Boating / 4 Launch Ramps / Marina
  • Fish Cleaning Station
  • Fishing / Ice Fishing
  • Fishing Piers / 2
  • Frisbee Golf Course
  • Hiking Trails (Frances Slocum SRA)
  • Hunting
  • Division Interpretive Services
  • Property Interpretive Services
  • Picnicking / Shelterhouse (Shelter Reservations)
  • Playground Equipment
  • Radio-Control Flying Field
  • Swimming / Beach (See Swim Alert)
  • Volleyball at Beach & Campground
  • Waterskiing

Camping

  • Full Hook-up / 39 sites
  • Electric / 335 sites
  • Non-electric / 57 sites
  • Rent-A-Camp Cabins
  • Youth Tent Areas
  • Dumping Station

Monroe Lake

Paynetown SRA, Fairfax SRA, Allen’s Creek SRA, Cutright SRA, Moore’s Creek SRA, Salt Creek SRA, Pine Grove SRA, Crooked Creek SRA
23,952 acres – 10,750-acres lake

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Electric / 226 sites
  • Non-electric / 94 sites
  • Camp Store (Seasonal)
  • Dumping Station

Patoka Lake

Newton-Stewart SRA, Jackson SRA, Lick Fork SRA, Little Patoka SRA, Painter Creek SRA, Walls Lake SRA, South Lick Fork SRA
25,800 acres – 8,800-acre lake

Activities & Facilities

  • Archery Range
  • Boating / 10 Launch Ramps
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Fishing / Ice Fishing
  • Disc Golf Course
  • Hiking / Fitness / Biking Trails
  • Hunting
  • Interpretive / Recreational Programs
  • Picnicking / Shelterhouse (Shelter Reservations)
  • Swimming / Beach (See Swim Alert)
  • Waterskiing

Camping

  • Electric / 455 sites
  • Primitive / 45 sites
  • Dumping Station

Salamonie Lake

Lost Bridge West SRA, Lost Bridge East SRA, Dora-New Holland SRA, Mount Etna SRA, Mount Hope SRA
11,594 acres – 2,855 acre lake

Activities & Facilities

Camping

  • Lost Bridge West SRA – Modern Electric Campground / 245 sites
  • Lost Bridge West SRA – Horsemen’s Campground / 50 primitive sites and Apple Orchard campground / 38 sites
  • Lost Bridge West SRA – 7 Youth Tent Areas
  • Lost Bridge West SRA – 2 Dump Stations and 4 Comfort Stations
  • Salamonie River State Forest – Horsemen’s Campground / 15 primitive sites and Family Primitive Campground / 21sites

Indiana Hiking

DNR Trails

1. Knobstone Trail (58.0 miles)
Division of Outdoor Recreation
402 West Washington St. Room 271,
Indianapolis, IN 46204
(317) 232-4070

2. Adventure Hiking Trail (27.0 miles)
Division of Forestry
Harrison Crawford/Wyandotte Complex
7240 Old Forest Road SW,
Corydon, IN 47112
(812) 738-8232

3. Adena Trace Loop (25.0 miles)
Division of State Parks and Reservoirs
Brookville Lake
P.O. Box 100,
Brookville, IN 47012
(765) 647-2657

4. Salamonie Trail (22.0 miles)
(snowmobiles allowed Dec. – March)
Division of State Parks and Reservoirs
Salamonie Lake
9214 West – Lost Bridge West,
Andrews, IN 46702
(260) 468-2125

5. Tecumseh Trail (42.0 miles)
Division of Forestry
Yellowwood State Forest
772 South Yellowwood Road,
Nashville, IN 47448
(812) 988-7945

6. Huntington Mountain Bike Trail (12.0 miles)
Division of State Parks and Reservoirs
J. Edward Roush Lake
517 North Warren Road,
Huntington, IN 46750
(260) 468-2165

7. Three Lakes Trail (10.0 miles) or
Low Gap Trail (10.0 miles)

Division of Forestry
Morgan – Monroe State Forest
6220 Forest Road,
Martinsville, IN 46151
(765) 342-4026

National Forest Trails

8. Hickory Ridge Trail (46.7 miles)

9. Charles C. Deam Wilderness (36.3 total miles)
Some areas are hiking only, no bicycles.

10. German Ridge Trail (24.0 miles)

11. Shirley Creek Trail (19.5 miles)

12. Oriole Trail (16.0 miles)

13. Two Lakes Loop Trail (15.7 miles)
Hiking only.

14. Mogan Ridge Trail (18.9 miles)
Some areas are hiking only.

15. Birdseye Trail (11.8 miles)

16. Youngs Creek Trail (10.5 miles)
USDA Forest Service
Hoosier National Forest
811 Constitution Avenue,
Bedford, IN 47421
(812) 275-5987

County Park Trails

17. Wabash Heritage Trail (10.0 miles)
Tippecanoe County Parks Dept.
4448 State Road 43 North,
West Lafayette, IN 47904
(765) 463-2405

Hiking Tips & Etiquette

Stay on Public Property

Stay on designated footpaths whenever possible, and do not trespass on private property. You are responsible for helping maintain good relations between hikers and private property owners.

Wear Bright Colors Only When You Need to Be Seen

Wearing bright colors during hunting season, particularly deer season, is a good idea. In fact, it may prevent injury or death. However, during other times of the year, bright reds, oranges and yellows serve to actually shrink the outdoors by visually intruding into the wide spaces and solitude which are part of the outdoor experience. When drab colors (browns, blues, and greens) are used for clothing and tents, individuals are visible at less distance, and more people can use the same general area without knowing of each other’s presence.

Finding and Protecting the Water

Sources of water in many areas are often limited and can fail during dry periods-plan ahead! Remember to treat all collected drinking and cooking water by boiling for several minutes or with a commercial water filter. Always wash your dishes or yourself a few feet away from the edge of a lake or stream. This way the soil acts as a filter, preventing soap suds and scraps of food from polluting the water. After washing your dishes, rinse them a safe distance from the bank. A few feet can make a big difference.

Keep Pets under Control

If you must bring your dog on the trail, make sure property regulations allow it. Keep your pet on a leash and under control. Make sure all pet waste is away from the trail. Do not allow your dog to bark at or chase other trail users or wildlife. Remember to bring food and water for your dog as well as for you.

Plan Your Trips

Before starting out, study maps of the area and learn the terrain. Be sure you are familiar with all the options of time, alternate routes, and weather. Do not forget the shorter daylight hours during late fall and winter. Be sure to travel with a first aid kit, map and compass, and cellular telephone (if available) and know how to use them. Remember to register at the nearest property office or gatehouse; for your safety, someone needs to know where you are.

Properly Dispose of Litter

Burying trash and garbage was once the ethical way to dispose of litter outdoors. However, animals and frost action usually undid the efforts after the campers were on their way. Today, the problem is compounded by the high number of people using the same areas. The best policy is to carry out what you carry in. You might consider going one step further and carry out any trash less thoughtful people may have left behind.

Be Careful with Fire

Leave No TraceTo reduce the possibility of a forest fire, we suggest that you use a portable backpacking stove rather than a campfire for cooking. A portable stove cooks your meal long before a fire is ready. Another advantage is that it helps prevent fire-blackened rocks in areas where people camp. If you want a campfire, make sure it is permitted. Different properties may have different rules regarding campfires. Even those that generally allow campfires may ban them on a temporary basis because of dry conditions, fire danger, etc. Remember the old rule when building a campfire-use only dead and down wood where permitted. Do not break or cut tree limbs or trees, even dead ones; dead trees provide habitat for many birds and animals. One more tip on firewood-do not stockpile wood. While this was once considered a friendly gesture in remote areas, today it is one more thing which reduces the spirit of solitude and independence which people seek. Any campfire in a backcountry area should be in a pit 12 inches or less in diameter, and a three-foot diameter area should be cleared to mineral soil around the fire. Prior to leaving an area where a campfire was built, mix ashes with the soil, fill the pit, and cover the cleared area with the humus layer which was originally removed.

Be Conscientious with Human Waste

To eliminate waste in areas where restrooms are not provided, use areas at least 200 feet from any water supply and camping zone. Dig a small hole approximately eight inches deep, which can then be covered with loose soil and leaf litter to promote decomposition and sanitary conditions.

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